The men and women who served in Vietnam did so because their country called upon them to step up and serve their nation’s military.  True to the oath of allegiance that was taken upon induction, we honorably answered that call.  We then left behind our friends and family and traveled to a war zone halfway around the world. In a place wrought with death and danger, we took our orders, struggled through unimaginable adversity and successfully completed our missions. Amidst much death and dying, “We secured our areas of operation and won the soldier’s war in Vietnam.”  Washington politics eventually imploded with the consequence that Saigon fell to the ravages of the North Vietnamese. As soldiers, we did our duty and completed our missions and if Washington lost their war in Vietnam then that’s their own damn fault!


These memoirs are told from”inside my jungle boots” but are dedicated to every Vietnam Veteran who served their country in America’s most misunderstood war. We faced “hell” over there and then encountered a different kind of “hell” upon our return and that was just plain wrong. These memoirs are my effort to set the record straight and if you choose to read them, I hope it makes you feel proud. I salute each and every one of my brother veterans for your personal sacrifice  and especially the men and women whose names now grace the “Wall” of our memorials in Washington, D.C.

May God Bless



Available on Amazon Kindle

Over 80 Five-Star Reviews



5.0 out of 5 stars This book covered the entire waterfront of emotions of those who served in Vietnam.September 13, 2013
By 
This review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
George's story is very personal and carries the reader through the highs and lows of being in a war zone. While "Courage on the Mountain" details his own unique experience, it reflects how many of us who served coped with being young in a distant land, relying of the relationships and bonds we forged with our fellow servicemen. The book illustrates how flawed many of the strategies and approaches to fighting a war that resulted in troops revisiting the same territories over and over again rather than fully securing the hamlets and villages and preventing the Viet Cong from re-establishing control. With that being said, the men and women who served in Vietnam were as patriotic as any and their commitment to achieving victory is reflected in their response to the missions they were called upon to complete. During the course of the book, George interjects some very heartwarming details of he encounters in Vietnam with individuals one would not expect to meet, including a sergeant that served under his father's command in WWII and his drill sergeant from basic training. For those who did not have the experience of serving in Vietnam, "Courage on the Mountain" serves as a reminder of the rejection Vietnam Vets experienced upon returning to the States. Returning from war and its physical and emotional scars are difficult for any individual; however, when compounded by the rejection of friends and family and lack of appreciation for their services makes the adjustment back to civilian life harder. George has had an opportunity to reflect on his service and come full circle and ultimately accepted that those were the times in which our destiny was written. This is an excellent book and is worth reading for those who served and for those who seek to understand what it was like serving at this important time in our history. George, thanks for your service!!!

5.0 out of 5 stars Another Great War Story!November 2, 2013
This review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
Although"Agony in Cambodia:A War Story" by Rod Keith is a fictional account of Special Forces action in the Vietnam War and "Courage on the Mountain" is a Non-fictional work,they are startlingly similar in their betrayal of the psychological impact of war and their attention to detail. They are both exceptional works and I recommend both wholeheartedly!

5.0 out of 5 stars Just excellent reading and well written!March 13, 2015
his review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
A very well written account of a Vietnam veteran who was drafted, fought in combat and tells it the way it really was. Almost half of combat soldiers in Vietnam were draftees, and the RA's and the US's did one fantastic job as one. To just barely survive this ordeal and come back to the USA and have these dimwits spit in your face tells a story of the dumbing down of America. These little sissies ran to Canada, and were pardoned by Carter, who in my opinion is also a leftist dimwit.

5.0 out of 5 stars A GREAT RECORD, HISTORICALLY CHRONICLING OUR RETURNING HEROS AND OUR NATIONS SHAMEJanuary 11, 2014

This review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
GEORGE REISCHLING I THANK YOU FIRST OF ALL FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY IN A TIME OF A CLOUDED POLITICAL DEBATE. THIS IS ONE OF THE FIRST BOOKS ON VIETNAM THA I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO FINISH AS OUR FAMILY LOST OUR OLDEST BROTHER TO VC FIRE ON MAY 21 1966. MY BROTHER WAS ALSO A MEMBER OF 25TH INFANTRY. HE WAS KILLED IN THE HO BO WOODS DURING OPERATION WAIHAIWA. BECAUSE OF THE PAIN OF HIS LOSS, WHICH MY MOTHER AND FATHER BOTH CARRIED TO THEIR GRAVES, ACCOMPANIED BY THE SHAME IN OUR COUNTRY AS OUR RETURNED TO AMERICA AT THE END OF THE WAR; I HAVE NOT BEEN ABLE TO READ ABOUT OUR MEN WHO GAVE ALL LIVING OR DEAD. I THANK YOU FOR YOUR CANDID AND COMPLETE MEMOIRS THAT YOU HAVE SHARED WITH US. I AM SURE THAT AS YOU READ YOUR NOTES MANY TEARS WERE SHED AS YOU WERE FORCED TO REMEMBER EVENTS THAT YOU THOUGHT HAD BEEN FILED AWAY IN YOUR MIND. FOR YOU TO ALLOW YOURSELF TO WALK BACK DOWN THOSES JUNGLES PATHS FOR US TO BE ALLOWED TO WALK WITH YOU IN DANGER AND HEART ACHE GIVES US A SAMPLING OF YOUR COURAGE AND BUILDS A TREMENDOUS RESPECT FOR YOU FROM ALL THOSE OF US WHO YOU ALLOWED INTO YOUR MIND AND LIFE. THANK YOU AGAIN FOR ALL YOU HAVE AND ARE STILL DOING FOR OUR WONDERFUL LAND!

5.0 out of 5 stars Courageous WritingAugust 6, 2014

This review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
I selected this book from the long list of Kindle memoirs because I served the same years as George near the twin to Nui Ba Den (Black Virgin Mountain) Nui Ba Ra (White Virgin Mountain) where the Ist Cav had a fire base at Song Be. He is an honest and detailed writer who has a graphic memory of the 25th Infantry’s area of operations and the events which so affected our generation in that faraway jungle.
I could not stop flipping the pages as his descriptions of patrols and actions were as gripping as any novel. His occasional wording or spellings errors added authenticity to his writing for me, as I know Kindle does not edit, and publishing houses say there is little interest in Vietnam war memoirs. We veterans need to argue with those publishers that this is one book they should consider as it defines the muddy infantry aspects of that terrible conflict.
Six months into his tour, on the eve of the Cambodian invasion, George’s prayerful request for a transfer to the 935th Medical Detachment (Psychiatric) in Long Binh was answered, possibly saving his life or limb. When I reached this part of the book, I was in shock, as I was also transferred to that same unit several months after George, although I had not recalled his name as our tours overlapped for only a few short weeks, some of which saw us on respective R & Rs.
We have since communicated by letter and email. He told me he took ten years to complete these memoirs which he wrote for his sons. His recall of events is amazing and accurate. His description of the excellent mental health work of the 935th is precise and on-target. His writing style is gripping and involving. His passion for veterans who served is heart-warming. All Vietnam veterans will relate to this fine memoir which may motivate them to share some of their own memories of that jungle war.

5.0 out of 5 stars An Important Autobiography That Gives A Grunt's View Exceptionally WellSeptember 30, 2014
By 
This review is from: Courage on the Mountain (Kindle Edition)
Mr. Reischling's book is an exceptional example of a Grunt baring his soul to the world, expecting nothing is return but a handshake and a heartfelt thanks for doing his duty to his, and our, country. Perhaps I am just a little bit prejudiced, having experienced the same emotions as he had, but I think that he speaks for a very large majority of Vietnam veterans. He comes very close to describing the nearly universal feelings of guilt for being glad that someone else had the bullet with their name on it, the terror of the first experience in combat, the long hours of boredom, the seconds of nearly overwhelming fear that came with every firefight and the horror of coming home to a country that, more than rejected you, but actually demonstrated hatred and fear of you. I realize that the preceding sentence was run-on, but that is the only way to even come close to expressing the complex feelings experienced by almost every Grunt who went to Vietnam and came back alive.

This book is not for everyone. It is written as a voice for those who cannot express their own emotions in combat. It is written to only those readers wishing to understand what it was like to be a Grunt in Vietnam. Whether your interest is in a book that you can use to give those people who ask you about what it was like in Vietnam or those of you who just want to know what it was to view the Vietnam war from a Grunt's eye view, this book will give you that perspective. It is a small slice of th history from one man's view of the Vietnam war.

The first half of the book is a description of life as a Grunt in Vietnam, the second half describes a rather unique but vital job that was one man's experiences in an unusual position in the war. I won't spoil this part of the book by being any more specific than that, but I think you will find it very interesting to read about other Grunts horrifying viewed from the third party, fellow Grunt's perspective.

Some people who are not Vietnam veterans may not understand the author's bitterness at the reception we who served in the last part of the Vietnam war received when we came home. But then those people who are offended by the description of those feelings, did not really want an unvarnished description of the life of a Grunt in the Vietnam war. Those feelings are a part of the feelings of a majority of returning Vietnam veterans. I, for one, will never be able to forgive Jane Fonda for what I consider an act of treachery and treason with her pilgrimage to North Vietnam and the statements she made there. I know that I never will.

Read this book. You will be horrified and entertained by the various experiences described in the book. A really good book.
 




Here is a sample of my new Book Brushy Mountain: Maximum Security

Available on Amazon Kindle




It was just past 2 a.m. when the prisoner van pulled out of Brushy Mountain Penitentiary headed for the main prison at Nashville. It was not unusual for prisoners to be transported at unconventional hours based on security concerns.  A lone and very dangerous prisoner rode handcuffed and shacked in the back seat of the vehicle.  He was a murderer who had escaped from the Arkansas State Penitentiary and within a month killed a policeman in East Tennessee. While in prison, he had killed two other inmates during a prison brawl resulting in a sentence of 327 years with no chance of parole.  His name was William Combs but the inmates nicknamed him “Killer.”  That nickname held a status and aura which he liked.  Most inmates feared him and kept their distance.  But suddenly over the last two weeks, Killer had gotten sick. He was so ill that his condition   dictated that he needed to be transferred from Brushy to the main infirmary at the prison in Nashville.  
The van had traveled for a little over half an hour on state route 116 which was an isolated back road which eventually led over to interstate 40.  Once on the interstate, it provided an unimpeded straight shot to Nashville.  Suddenly, loud moaning came from the back of the vehicle.  “Guard, I’m real sick and fixing to puke and crap on myself all at once,” groaned Killer. No response came from the guards. “Guard, you’ve got to pull over and let me puke on the side of the road or you’re going to smell shit and puke all the way to Nashville.  Damnit, I’m handcuffed and shackled so there’s no way anything can happen.  Please, please pull over for just a moment and let me lean out and puke.”   “We’ll pull over for just a minute but you do not get out of the vehicle,” responded one guard. “Just swivel your legs out onto the ground and lean down and puke.  If you try to run, you’re a dead man.”  “I got it, I got it, so just hurry and pull over,” came the reply from Killer. The van pulled over and both guards came around.  The passenger door could only be opened from the outside and so one guard used a key to unlock it and swung open the door. Killer rolled his legs out and leaned forward.  “Go ahead and do it” said one guard as he walked around the door.  Killer suddenly lunged into the door knocking the guard to the ground and rose to his feet yielding a small 38 caliber pistol. His first shot hit the farthest guard in the chest knocking him backward.  After struggling to recover from the impact of the car door, the second guard regained his balance only to be shot twice, once in the stomach with a second round lodging in his shoulder.  Killer reached out and drug one guard close enough to retrieve the keys to his shackles and handcuffs.  Once free from the restraints, he shoved both guards down into a drainage ditch and climbed behind the steering wheel of the van.  After driving about 5 miles, he met a prearranged contact, hid the prison van and switched vehicles.  Now in an unmarked car, they disappeared into the night.
At about 7 a.m. the next morning a sheriff’s deputy spotted the two guards bodies lying in the ditch and dispatched an ambulance.  One guard was dead and the other was alive but in serious condition.  An all points bulletin (APB) was issued and the manhunt for Killer Combs was on. Alerts went out to all county sheriffs throughout Tennessee including contact with the U.S. Marshals office who immediately ordered roadblocks for 100 miles in every direction from the location of the escape.  Of primary concern was Killer’s home district of Cocke County situated deep in the mountains of rural east Tennessee.
Killer was born in a small mountain shack perched partway up on a mountainside 20 miles back in the hill country out of Newport, Tennessee.  Cocke County was moon shining country and the residents there were dirt poor, many etching a living off of selling the illegal corn brew.  His entire family was notorious for frequent brushes with local law enforcement and he followed in their footsteps.

The sheriff of Cocke County knew Killer well and when he was alerted of his escape, he immediately dispatched several deputies throughout the region trying to gather information as to whether their infamous former resident had come home.  It didn’t take

long for word to surface that he indeed had returned and according to his kinfolk, “He’s holed up there in the ole cabin and just waitin’!”  Law enforcement for miles around converged stirring up so much dust speeding over the old dirt road that it looked like a herd of buffalo had stampeded down the valley.  
After a brief altercation erupted between the US Marshals and the Cocke county sheriff concerning exactly who had jurisdiction over this operation, thirty lawmen were dispatched to completely encircle the old dilapidated sawmill built plank cabin.  The commander of the Marshal’s service raised a bullhorn and ordered, “Come on out Killer, you’re surrounded with no way of escape.”  No reply came.  A minute later he again pushed the button of the bullhorn and stated emphatically, “Killer you can’t escape so come on out, place your weapons on the porch and surrender!”  Suddenly, the door swung open and Killer stepped out onto the porch brandishing a pistol in both hands.  “Go to hell you son of a bitches,” he yelled and began firing.  Without waiting for the order, every police officer in the cordon opened fire with most completely emptying their service revolvers.  Riddled with bullets, Killer crumpled into a ball and rolled forward down the steps into the yard.  He had 19 slugs in his body and was dead.  A coroner was dispatched and after filling out a death certificate, his body was transported back to Brushy Mountain.  
To the inmates at Brushy he was a hero.  Many believed that he knew from the inception of his escape plan that he would be killed.  Most said that he had a “Death Wish” and just wanted to go home to die rather than spend the rest of his life in the

hell hole that was Brushy Mountain Penitentiary.  The piece of the puzzle that could not be uncovered was just where and how did he get the 38 caliber pistol which he used to shoot the guards during his escape?  There is an unwritten inmate honor code and mystique that cloaks the answer to that mystery and dictates that those who actually know would rather die than divulge it. Regardless of the lack of specific details comprising his escape with his ensuing violent death, he did make the last call on his life and in so doing left a legacy for others to recall.
The prison chaplain oversaw a somber ceremony for him and his remains now lay in a common inmate grave at the back of the prison. The inscription on the small marble headstone is simply notates “William Combs, 1946-1969.”  He would no doubt have been disappointed by the fact that his infamous nickname “Killer” was excluded.




5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!July 14, 2016
By 
This review is from: Brushy Mountain Maximum Security (Kindle Edition)
Fantastic book. It's very interesting to see what maximum security prisons are like from the perspective of someone who was actually working there. This is a great, un-biased account and an awesome read! I would recommend it to anyone. Great job, George! I would highly recommend it!


5.0 out of 5 stars A good adventure filled with very interesting characters showing a side ...May 28, 2016
By 
This review is from: Brushy Mountain Maximum Security (Kindle Edition)
A good adventure filled with very interesting characters showing a side of prison that we have seldom read about.


5.0 out of 5 stars Five StarsJune 6, 2016

This review is from: Brushy Mountain Maximum Security (Kindle Edition)
Written from a person who has first hand knowledge of Brushy Mountain. Well Done.
Raymond M. Williams









George & Buddy